GEORGE TEYSSOT ‘FLESH’

July 31, 2011

 

Teyssot states that, the skin and the clothes refer to codifications of social order such as fashion or social status. Clothes and skin can be manipulated to confer a recognized meaning on the body. All of this activity refers to a code and conforms to a norm. Bodies are deemed to present a unified code by mechanizing them.  By becoming a pure sign recognizable so the social level, the body in turn receives a named discourse a proper name an identity. (Teyssot, 1994: p. 12)

 ‘Aesthetic or cosmetic surgery also aims at erasing characteristic sexual traits, or at camouflaging somatoethnic features, in an effort to attain an ideal, objectified body’. (Teyssot, 1994: p. 18)

The diagram is addressing the idea of the enforced alteration upon the human body favouring the acceptable set of rules. Through this process individuality and uniqueness gives way to a unified appearance that is widely recognised. Critical absence results into a blind stream of disciples who conform to this attitude which they adopt by being exposed to a media brainwash, promoting a certain fashion and lifestyle, whether that is translated into clothing or body manipulation. The perfect body and beauty are subjective terms that evolve and are controlled by the industry which addresses them. By adding a psychological stress to the human being they achieve a healthy economic growth, while the population becomes enslaved to their trends. Technological advancement is employed to extend the level of manipulation.  Teyssot mentions it as ‘the heroic will to voluntary subject one’s body to an endless cycle of repeated operations, in order to repair it, and make it into an ideal object, instead of accepting it as a place of difference and otherness’. (Teyssot, 1994: p. 17)

 

 

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Georges Teyssot, (1994), Flesh: The Mutant Body of Architecture, Princeton Architectural Press

Andreas Sivitos

 

One Response to “GEORGE TEYSSOT ‘FLESH’”


  1. You might also consider creating a link between Teyssot on the Diagram and Deleuze?
    Also, place your name at the bottom of the post.


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