Archive for the '01_Readings' Category

Infrastructure and Gender – readings and tasks

August 22, 2018

In advance of each seminar meeting you are required to read at least one of the key essays closely. In your blog post (composed of line drawing and text) you are to respond carefully to an argument, detail or concept in the text that you believe is critically valuable (you do not need to respond to the whole text or summarise it in detail). The further readings are provided for those who want to read beyond the key texts. You are also encouraged to bring in other references that you have found relevant. The idea is to incrementally build up an account of the infrastructural site you have chosen to care about during this seminar. When using concepts and arguments that you have discovered in the readings, try and relate them to the material relations and specific details of your chosen site. Use your site as a lens through which to engage in the readings. Except for our first introductory meeting, the blog posts need to be uploaded in advance of our seminar meetings, so we can use them in our class discussions.

GENERAL BACKGROUNDS READINGS

Frichot, Hélène, How to Make Yourself a Feminist Design Power Tool, Baunach AADR, 2016.

Frichot, Hélène, Gabrielsson, Catharina, Runting, Helen, eds. Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies, London: Routledge, 2018. (copy of the introduction attached)

Reisinger, Karin and Schalk, Meike, eds. Styles of Queer Feminist Practices and Objects in Architecture, special issue Architecture and Culture vol. 5, 2017. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/20507828.2017.1386942

Reisinger, Karin and Schalk, Meike, eds. Becoming a feminist Architect, in a special issue of Field: A Free Journal for Architecture, vol 7, 1, 2017. http://field-journal.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/FIELD-2017-latest.pdf

Schalk, Meike, Mazé, Ramia, Kristiansson, Thérèse, eds. Feminist Futures of Spatial Practice, Baunach: AADR, 2017.

Wednesday 12 September– Introduction 13.00-15.00 (for all Masters and AD236V participants and 15.30-17.00 (for participants in AD236V)

  1. Gendered Infrastructures

Ross Exo Adams, ‘Becoming-Infrastructural’ in positions e-flux, 2 October 2017. http://www.e-flux.com/architecture/positions/149606/becoming-infrastructural/

Keller Easterling, ‘An Internet of Things’, in e-flux #31 January, 2012. http://www.e-flux.com/journal/31/68189/an-internet-of-things/

Further Readings

Pierre Bélanger, ‘Redefining Infrastructure’ in Pierre Bélanger, Landscape as Infrastructure, London: Routledge, 2016, 116-155. https://www.academia.edu/7642500/Redefining_Infrastructure

Dane Carlson, ‘The Humanity of Infrastructure: Landscape as Operative Ground’ in Scenario Journal, Spring 2013. https://scenariojournal.com/article/humanity-of-infrastructure/

Keller Easterling, Extrastatecraft: The Power of Infrastructure Space, New York: Verso Books, 2014. Excerpt.

Rachel M. Magee, Melinda Sebastian, Susan Wiedenbeck, Jennifer A. Rode, ‘Gendering Infrastructure’ in CHI 2011, May 7-12, 2011.

Jennifer A. Rode, Melinda Sebastian, Rachel Magee, Nora McDonald and Sean Goggins ‘Does Infrastructure have Gender? Third Order Dilemmas’ in ALTCHI, 2012. https://www.academia.edu/3204661/Does_Infrastructure_have_Gender_Third-order_Dilemmas

Katrina Stoll and Scott Lloyd ‘Introduction: Performance as Form’ in Katrina Stoll and Scott Lloyd, eds Infrastructure as Architecture, Berlin: Jovis, 2010, 4-7.

TASK 1: Look for an example of an architectural space or system that supports an infrastructural network and document it with diagrammatic line drawings. The kinds of architectural spaces that support infrastructures are usually banal, even near invisible, and include waiting rooms and warehouses, call centres and parking lots, toll booths and public toilets. Your choice of case study could be based on a local (Stockholm) infrastructural network that you use on a daily basis (train, boat, bus, bicycle, animal highway, data network, other), or it could be an architectural-engineering example that you would like to examine in more detail. Based on the readings above discuss the relationship between a) infrastructure, b). architecture and c). gender, by making reference to your case study. Write 300-500 words and upload with your line drawing.

Wednesday 19 September-13.00-15.00 and 15.30-17.30

  1. Infrastructural Vulnerabilities

Butler, Judith (2014), ‘Rethinking Vulnerability and Resistance’. Available online: http://bibacc.org/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/Rethinking-Vulnerability-and-Resistance-Judith-Butler.pdf

Butler, Judith (2016), ‘Vulnerability and Resistance’, in Judith Butler, Zeynep Gambetti and Leticia Sabsay (eds),Vulnerability in Resistance, 12–27, Durham, NC: Duke University Press.

Judith Butler, Arne De Boever, ‘Demonstrating Precarity’ in Los Angeles Review of Books,March 2015. https://lareviewofbooks.org/av/demonstrating-precarity-vulnerability-embodiment-resistance/#!

Further Readings

Bettina Stoetze, ‘Infrastructure _ Peripheral Visions and Bodies that Matter: A Commentary’,  in Engagement2016. https://aesengagement.wordpress.com/2016/08/23/infrastructure-peripheral-visions-and-bodies-that-matter-a-commentary/

TASK 2: Infrastructures often reveal themselves at the moment of failure (think, for instance, of the recent disaster of the collapse of the Morandi Bridge in Genoa https://www.theguardian.com/world/2018/aug/17/italys-crumbling-infrastructure-under-scrutiny-after-bridge-collapse), at which juncture it becomes clear that infrastructures are like complex machines that take into their cogs and wheels not just material and tectonic relations, but social ones too. Develop the diagram you have begun of your chosen infrastructure case study by including social flows, gatherings and modes of inhabitation, cultural rituals, and so forth. That is to say, illustrate how your chosen infrastructure is populated and used. Use 300-500 words and illustrate with line drawings.

  1. Infrastructural Instruments

Simone Brott, ‘Collective Equipments of Power: The Road and the City’ in Thresholds 40, Socio-, MIT School of Architecture and Planning, 2012, 47-54.

Ronald Rael, ‘Boundary Line Infrastructure’, in Thresholds 40, Socio-, MIT School of Architecture and Planning, 2012, 75-82.

Francesco Marullo, ‘Logistics Takes Command’, in Log 35, 2015.

TASK 3: Infrastructures are complex material and immaterial systems that are both technological as well as socio-political. Analyse and discuss your chosen infrastructure in terms of its components and how they operate in relation to each other. You might want to discuss the historical emergence of your particular infrastructural case study. Document with line drawings by using an exploded axonometric. Write 300-500 words.

Wednesday 10 October– 13.00-15.00 and 15.30-17.30

  1. Infrastructural Love

Hannes Frykolm and Olga Tengvall, ‘Infrastructural Love’, in Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, and Helen Runting, eds. Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge: 2018

Libe García Zarranz, ‘Love Enough! Dionne Brand and Rosi Braidotti’s Affective Transpositions’ in Atlantis38:2, 2017.

Further readings:

Brady Burroughs, Architectural Flirtations, PhD Thesis, KTH Stockholm, 2016. http://kth.diva-portal.org/smash/get/diva2:1039033/FULLTEXT01.pdf

Sylvia Lavin, Kissing Architecture, New York: Princeton University Press, 2011. Excerpt.

TASK 4:Write a brief love letter dedicated to your chosen (architectural) infrastructure. 300-500 words, complemented by line drawings.

  1. Infrastructural Affects

Sara Ahmed, ‘Happy Objects’, in The Promise of Happiness, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

Sara Ahmed, ‘Orientations Towards A Queer Phenomenology’ in GLQ 12:4, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2006.

Further readings:

Melissa Gregg, ed. ‘Affect.’ M/C Journal 8.6 (2005). 25 Nov. 2011 http://journal.media-culture.org.au/0512/

Nigel Thrift, ‘Spatialities of Feeling’ in Non-Representational Theory: Space, Politics, Affect, London: Routledge, 2008.

Gregory Seijworth and Melissa Gregg ‘An Inventory of Shimmers’ in Gregory Seijworth and Melissa Gregg eds. The Affect Theory Reader, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

Eric Shouse, ‘Feeling, Emotion, Affect’, in Melissa Gregg, ed. ‘Affect.’ M/C Journal 8.6 (2005). 25 Nov. 2011. http://journal.media-culture.org.au/0512/03-shouse.php

TASK 3: Affect is a complex concept that relates to both emotions and feelings. Sara Ahmed discusses our relations to objects and each other in terms of the affect of happiness. Imagine how such affects as happiness or sadness, associated for instance with inclusion and exclusion, relate to the spaces and functions of infrastructure. Diagram and discuss (300-500 words) in relation to your infrastructural case study.

Wednesday 31 October– 13.00-18.00 A108

(Obligatory for AD236V participants, optional for Masters students).

Please reserve this date for a wikiD workshop with Professor Lori Brown, Syracuse Architecture, US, and founder of ArchiteXX.

WikiD: women, Wikipedia, design is an international education and advocacy program to increase the representation of women in the built environment on Wikipedia. This collaborative project between Parlour (http://archiparlour.org/topics/wikid/), Architexx (New York) and n-ails (Berlin) has seed funding from the Wikimedia Foundation. 

Your Preparation see: http://archiparlour.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/09/WikiD-Guides-1_version11.pdf and Despina Stratigakos on why editing Wikipedia matters https://placesjournal.org/article/ unforgetting-women-architects-from-the- pritzker-to-wikipedia/

Wednesday 14 November– 13.00-15.00 and 15.30-17.30

  1. Infrastructural Maintenance

Catharina Gabrielsson, ‘The Critical Potential of Housework’ in Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, and Helen Runting, eds. Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge: 2018, 246-255.

Janek Ozmin, The Garage: Maintenance and Gender’ in Hélène Frichot, Catharina Gabrielsson, and Helen Runting, eds. Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies, Abingdon, Oxon: Routledge: 2018, 256-264.

Valeria Graziano and Kim Trogal, ‘The Politics of Collective Repair: Examining object relations in a postwork society’, in Cultural Studies, vol. 31, No. 5, 2017.

Further Reading:

Mierle Ukeles ‘Sanitation Manifesto’ (1984), also reproduced in Kristine Stiles and Peter Selz (eds) Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art (1996) http://www.ktpress.co.uk/feminist-art-manifestos.asp

TASK 6: If infrastructure becomes most evident at the moment of failure, this means that infrastructure is vulnerable to breakdown and negative entropy. Offer an account of where your infrastructure is apt to break down. Discuss in 300-500 words and illustrate with line drawings.

  1. Infrastructural Care

Virginia Held, ‘The Ethics of Care as Moral Theory’ in The Ethics of Care: Personal, Political, and Global, Oxford: Oxford University Press.

Maria Puig de la Bellacasa, (2012), ‘Nothing comes without its world: thinking with care’, The Sociological Review, 60: 197–216.

Further Reading

Doucet, Isabelle and Frichot, Hélène, eds. ‘Introduction: Resist, Reclaim, Speculate’ in Architectural Theory Review 22:1, 2018. http://www.tandfonline.com/action/showAxaArticles?journalCode=ratr20 (I also encourage you to read some of the other articles in this issue).

Puig de la Bellacasa, Maria (2017), Matters of Care: Speculative Ethics in More than Human Worlds, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.

TASK 7: Infrastructures are in need of constant maintenance and care. Discuss how and where architecture could be used as a means of caring for your infrastructural case study. Discuss in 300-500 words and illustrate with line drawings.

Wednesday 28 November– Conclusion 13.00-17.00 

  1. Final Presentations

At our final meeting you will be asked to present the draft of your Infrastructural Care booklet (pdf format). You will have 5 minutes to present your work, and one of your peers will be assigned to offer a review. You will also receive feedback from the seminar leader and the other members of the class. Following the review of your draft you have 2 weeks to finalise your ‘Infrastructural Care’ booklet and submit it to the seminar blog at: https://archandphil.wordpress.com/category/03_projects/

Anthropocene Feminisms: Architecture and Gender

February 18, 2018

In advance of each seminar meeting you are required to read at least one of the key essays closely. In your blog post (composed of image and text) you are to respond carefully to some aspect of the text that you believe is critically valuable (you do not need to respond to the whole text in detail). The further readings are provided for those who want to read beyond the key texts. You are also encouraged to bring in other references that you have found valuable. The idea is to incrementally build up an account of the site you have chosen to care about during this seminar. When using concepts and arguments that you have discovered in the readings, try and relate them to the material relations and specific details of your chosen site. Use your site as a lens through which to engage in the readings. The blog posts need to be uploaded in advance of our seminar meetings, so we can use them in our class discussions.

GENERAL BACKGROUNDS READINGS

Frichot, Hélène, How to Make Yourself a Feminist Design Power Tool, Baunach AADR, 2016.

Frichot, Hélène, Gabrielsson, Catharina, Runting, Helen, eds. Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economies, Technologies, London: Routledge, 2018. (copy of the introduction attached)

Reisinger, Karin and Schalk, Meike, eds. Styles of Queer Feminist Practices and Objects in Architecture, special issue Architecture and Culture vol. 5, 2017. https://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/20507828.2017.1386942

Reisinger, Karin and Schalk, Meike, eds. Becoming a feminist Architect, in a special issue of Field: A Free Journal for Architecture, vol 7, 1, 2017. http://field-journal.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/01/FIELD-2017-latest.pdf

Schalk, Meike, Mazé, Ramia, Kristiansson, Thérèse, eds. Feminist Futures of Spatial Practice, Baunach: AADR, 2017.

Meeting 01 Wednesday 21 February 14.00-16.00 KTH Architecture (A524)

ANTHROPOCENE FEMINISMS

Barber, Daniel (2016), ‘Architectural History in the Anthropocene’, Journal of Architecture, 21 (8): 1165–70.

Haraway, Donna ‘Tentacular Thinking: Athropocene, Capitalocene, Chthulucene’, in e-flux #76, September 2016 http://www.e-flux.com/journal/75/67125/tentacular-thinking-anthropocene-capitalocene-chthulucene/

Turpin, Etienne, ed. (2013), ‘Introduction’ in Architecture in the Anthropocene: Encounters Among Design, Deep Time, and Philosophy, Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, Michigan Publishing, 2013. http://www.openhumanitiespress.org/books/titles/architecture-in-the-anthropocene/(pdf of book can be downloaded here)

Background Readings

Colebrook, Claire and Weinstein, Jami. ‘Introduction: Anthropocene Feminisms: Rethinking the Unthinkable. philoSOPHIA, vol. 5, no. 2, Summer 2015, 167-178.

Grusin, Richard. ‘Introduction: Anthropocene Feminisms: An Experiment in Collaborative Theorizing’ in Richard Grusin ed. Anthropocene Feminism, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017.

Frichot, Hélène, Gabrielsson, Catharina, Runting, Helen, eds. Architecture and Feminisms: Ecologies, Economes, Technologies, London: Routledge, 2017. Excerpt.

TASK

Upload an image and text post that responds to the readings and describes the site you will engage in for this elective seminar. You are welcome to upload more than one post.

Meeting 02 Wednesday 7 March 10.00-12.00 (A534) and 13.00-17.00 (A123) KTH Architecture

CARTOGRAPHY of EXHAUSTION

Colebrook, Claire. ‘Introduction’ in Claire Colebrook, Death of the PostHuman: Essays on Extinction, vol. 1. Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, University of Michigan Library, 2014. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/o/ohp/12329362.0001.001

Colebrook, Claire. ‘Feminist Extinction’ in Claire Colebrook, Sex After Life: Essays on Extinction, vol. 2. Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, University of Michigan Library, 2014. https://quod.lib.umich.edu/o/ohp/12329363.0001.001

READ THIS as a reflection back to the 90s, and ask yourself whether we have exhausted such questions yet, or whether we must continue exhaustively to attend to the field of architecture and feminisms: Debra Coleman, ‘Introduction’ in Debra Coleman, Elizabeth Danze, Carol Henderson, eds.  Architecture and Feminism, New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1996.

Background Readings

Deleuze, Gilles. ‘The Exhausted’, in SubStance, vol. 24, no. 3, issue 78, 1995, 3-28.

Parikka, Jussi. ‘Dust and Exhaustion: The Labour of Media Materialism’, in ctheory.net 2013 https://journals.uvic.ca/index.php/ctheory/article/view/14790/5665

Pelbart Peter Pàl, Cartography of Exhaustion: Nihilism Inside Out, Minneapolis: Univocal Publishing, 2015. Excerpt.

TASK

  1. Upload an image and text post that responds to the readings in relation to your site.
  2. Upload an image and text post that responds to one of the lectures from the afternoon session dedicated to design research.

 

 

Meeting 03 Wednesday 28 March 10.00-12.00 and 13.00-15.00

Room A524 KTH Architecture 

ON THINGS and HOW TO FOLLOW THE MATERIAL

Please select two essays from the readings listed below to focus upon:

Appadurai, Arjun. ‘The Thing Itself’ in Public Culture, 18.1, 2006, 15-21.

Bennett, Jane. ‘The Force of Things: Steps toward an Ecology of Matter’, in Political Theory, vol. 32, no. 3, 2004, 347-372.

Grosz, Elizabeth. ‘The Thing’ in Elizabeth Grosz, Architecture from the Outside: Essays on Virtual and Real Space, 167–83, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2001.

Latour, Bruno. ‘Why Has Critique Run out of Steam? From Matters of Fact to Matters of Concern’ Critical Inquiry, Winter 2004, 225-248.

Serres, Michel. ‘Theory of the Quasi-Object’ in Michel Serres, The Parasite, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2007.

Steyerl, Hito. ‘A Thing Like You and Me’ in e-flux Journal #15 April 2010 http://www.e-flux.com/journal/15/61298/a-thing-like-you-and-me/

TASK

  1. Upload an image and text post that responds to the readings on THINGS and relates to your site.
  2. Upload an image and text post that responds to the idea or process of ‘following the materials’ and relates to your site, and to ‘things’ of interest.

Meeting 04 Wednesday 11 April 10.00-12.00 and 13.00-15.00 KTH Architecture A524

ANTHROPOCENE STORY-TELLING

Bennett, Jane. ‘Political Ecologies’ in Jane Bennett, Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things, Durham, NC: Duke University Press, 2010. Excerpt.

Doucet, Isabelle and Frichot, Hélène, eds. ‘Introduction: Resist, Reclaim, Speculate’ in Architectural Theory Review 22:1, 2018. http://www.tandfonline.com/action/showAxaArticles?journalCode=ratr20 (I also encourage you to read some of the other articles in this issue).

Haraway, Donna, Staying with the Trouble: Making Kin in the Chthulucene, Durham: Duke University Press, 2016. Excerpt.

Heise, Ursula K. ‘Introduction: Planet, Species, Justice – and the stories we tell about them.’ In The Routledge Companion to the Environmental Humanities, edited by Ursula K. Heise and Jon Christensen, Michelle Niemann Abingdon, Oxon and New York: Routledge, 2017, 1-10. (Note: This publication is available as an electronic resource from the KTH Library).

Rendell, Jane. ‘Prologue: Prepositions’ in Jane Rendell, Site Writing, London: I.B. Tauris, 2010.

Swanson, Heather, Tsing, Anna, Bubandt, Nils, Gan, Elaine, eds. ‘Introduction: Bodies Tumbled into Bodies’ in Arts of Living on a Damaged Planet, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2017.

TASK

  1. Upload an image and text post that responds to the readings and relates to your site. Frame this post as a story to be told about your site.
  2. Upload an image and text post exploring another approach to anthropocene story-telling. Try a different genre, test a different writing experiment.

 

Meeting 05 Conclusion-Examination 13.00-15.00 KTH Architecture A524

Compile your 6 to 7 Blog posts as a series of chapters in a graphically formatted pdf booklet, and upload to: https://archandphil.wordpress.com/category/02_discussion/

These booklets will be presented at our final meeting, and then revised and resubmitted on 9th May 2018. Prepare a 5 minute presentation of your booklet for our final meeting.

Your Anthropocene Feminisms Booklet must include: 1. a title page, and don’t forget your name! 2. Contents page (with 6 – 7 chapters based on the themes discussed in our meetings) 3. a brief introductory essay that explains how you have organised your booklet and introduces your key discoveries and reflects on what you have achieved in the seminar. 4. 6-7 Chapters based on revised blogposts (be sure to reference the readings too) 5. Bibliography where you should include not only all the references you have made to the readings (and whatever other references you have found useful), but also references to any appropriated imagery or creative projects you might have used from architecture, art, film, literature. The booklet needs to use appropriate references, such as endnotes or footnotes or in text referencing throughout.

Final presentation of pdf booklet in draft form: Wednesday 25 April 13.00

FINAL DEADLINE: final submission of revised pdf booklet Wednesday 9 May 2018.

READINGS Architecture+Gender Autumn 2016

August 31, 2016

MEETING 01 Friday 30 September 2016

Lori Brown, ‘Introduction’ in Lori Brown ed., Feminist Practices:  Interdisciplinary Approaches to Women in Architecture, Ashgate, Farnham, Burlington, 2011, pp. 1-15.

Lori Brown, ‘Introduction’ in Lori Brown, Contested Spaces: Abortion Clinics, Women’s Shelters and Hospitals, Routledge, Oxon, New York, 2013, pp. 1-19.

Jane Rendell, ‘Critical Spatial Practices: Setting out a Feminist Approach to some Modes and What Matters in Architecture’ in Lori Brown ed., Feminist Practices: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Women in Architecture, Ashgate, Farnham, Burlington, 2011 , pp. 17-55.

Meike Schalk, Brady Burroughs, Katja Grillner, Katarina Bonnevier, ‘FATALE Critical Studies in Architecture’, in Nordic Journal of Architecture Vol 2 2012, pp. 90-96.

 

MEETING 02 Friday 07 October 2016

Jane Bennett, ‘The Agency of Assemblages’, in Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

Donna Haraway, ‘Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspectives’, in Feminist Studies, Vol. 14, No. 3 1988, pp. 575–599.

Isabell Stengers, ‘An Ecology of Practices’, in Cultural Studies Review Vo 11 No 1 March 2005, pp. 183-196.

Sara Ahmed, ‘Conclusion: Disorientation and Queer Objects’, in Queer Phenomenology: Orientations, Objects, Others, Duke University Press, Durham, London, 2006, pp. 157-179.

 

HERE YOU CAN DOWNLOAD BRADY BURROUGHS DISSERTATION, ‘Architectural Flirtations’!

HERE YOU CAN SEE THE  PRELIMINARY BOOK OF ABSTRACTS OF ‘ARCHITECTURE AND FEMINISMS’!

 

MORE READINGS:

J.K. Gibson-Graham, ‘A Feminist Project of Belonging for the Anthropocene’, Gender, Place and Culture, 18.01, 2011, pp. 1-21.

May-Britt Öhman, ‘Embodied Vulnerabilities in Large-scale Technical Systems’, in Bodies, Boundaries and Vulnerabilities, Springer, 2016, pp. 47-79.

Katie Lloyd Thomas, ‘Between the Womb and the World’, in Relational Architectural Ecologies: Architecture, Nature and Subjectivity, Routledge, London, New York, 2013, pp. 192-208.

Katie Lloyd Thomas, ‘Introduction: Architecture and Material Practice’, in Material Matters: Architecture and Material Practice, Rutledge, London, New York, 2007, pp. 2-12.

Peg Rawes, ‘Architectural Ecologies of Care’ in Peg Rawes, ed. in Relational Architectural Ecologies: Architecture, Nature and Subjectivity, London: Routledge, 2013, pp. 40-55.

READINGS Architecture, Gender, Technology AUTUMN 2014

August 29, 2014

Notes on the readings you will find below: In advance of each seminar meeting you are required to read at least one of the key essays closely. In your blog post (composed of image and text) you are to respond carefully to some aspect of the text that you believe is critically valuable (you do not need to respond to the whole text in detail). The further readings are provided for those who want to read beyond the key texts. The further readings help situate the question of architecture, gender and technology in the context of what has come to be called (still controversially) the anthropocene. The anthropocene is the name appointed to a brief geologic age that has witnessed massive environmental change at a planetary level. Swiftly effectuated following the invention of the steam engine and its revolutionary impact upon industrial production the anthropocene is a geologic age created by ‘man’ and his ever-developing technologies. It is a term that helps us think the relationship between technology and environment (see J.K. Gibson Graham). There are also accounts of another associated term given above, and that is the ‘posthuman’. This challenging concept does not necessarily anticipate the extinction of the human species, so much as the urgent need to re-conceptualise what the human is, and how it practices its modes of inhabitation (see N. Katherine Hayles and Braidotti). This leads us to a third theme, after the anthropocene, and after the posthuman, and that is the theme of ecology, and how we might rethink our own modes of being as ‘eco-subjects’ and to imagine new ‘relational architectural ecologies’ in order to deal with our new age, the athropocene (see Verena Andermatt Conley and Peg Rawes). How we shift our modes of being or styles of life also relates to how we situate our knowledge (Donna Haraway) and develop our (architectural) methodologies (Sandra Harding). It could be that one approach might be through the invention of new feminist technologies? (see Linda Layne and Judith A. McGaw). I hope that we can address many of these concepts and questions when we come together in our seminar meetings this term!

MEETING 01 Introduction: Posthuman Landscapes and the Anthropocene

Linda L. Layne, ‘Introduction’ in Linda L. Layne, Sharra L. Vostral, Kate Boyer, eds. Feminist Technology, Urbana, Chicago, Springfield: University of Illinois Press, 2010.

Judith A. McGaw, ‘Why Feminist Technologies Matter’ in Nina E. Lerman, Ruth Oldenziel, Arwen P. Mohun, eds, Gender and Technology: A Reader, Baltimore and London: John Hopkins University Press, 2003.

-Rosi Braidotti, ‘Introduction’ in The Posthuman, Malden, MA: Polity Press, 2013.

-J.K. Gibson-Graham, ‘A Feminist Project of Belonging for the Anthropocene’, in Gender, Place and Culture, 18.01, 2011, pp. 1-21.

FURTHER READING:

Verena Andermatt Conley, ‘Eco Subjects’ in Verena Andermatt Conley, ed. Rethinking Technologies, Minneapolis, MN: University of Minnesota Press, 1993.

Donna Haraway, ‘Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspectives’, in Feminist Studies, Vol. 14, No. 3, pp. 575–599, 1988.

Sandra Harding, ‘Introduction: Is There a Feminist Methodology?’, in Sandra Harding , ed. Feminism and Methodology, Indiana University Press, 1987.

N. Katherine Hayles, ‘Afterword: The Human in the Posthuman’ in Cultural Critique, No. 53, Posthumanism (Winter 2003), pp. 134-137. Peg Rawes, ed. Relational Architectural Ecologies: Architecture, Nature, and Subjectivity, London: Routledge, 2013.

REFERENCE TEXT for Posthuman Landscapes STORYBOOK EXERCISE: Jakob von Uexküll, A Foray into the Worlds of Animals and Humans, trans. Joseph D. O’Neil, Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press.

This text is provided to help you think about how you might create your own post human landscapes storybook. Uexküll’s work can be read as a ‘storybook’ of sorts, including little narratives of different creatures and wonderful storybook pictures attempting to describe what is significant in the worlds of these creatures (including human beings). You are not expected to read this entire extended essay, instead look for a chapter that interests you, and see how Uexküll uses his illustrations. Take inspiration!  

INSTRUCTION 01 Based on the seminar readings and seminar discussions provisionally define what a ‘posthuman landscape’ might be. You may find that your definition needs to be revised as we proceed through the seminar meetings. Select a site that can be framed in terms of the concept of a ‘posthuman landscape’. Such a site should be situated in relation to our relatively new geologic age that has come to be called the ‘anthropocene’ (see J.K. Gibson-Graham). Furthermore, ‘site’ here should be conceived in an expanded sense; it is not necessarily a conventionally defined ‘architectural site’. While your site might be discovered in your local neighbourhood, you might also draw on a ‘scene’ from an influential movie; or a setting in a novel; you might respond to an artist’s body of work; or you might choose to focus on a site that directly relates to your current design research or interests. While a ‘posthuman landscape’ suggests a large-scale site, it may be a site of any scale from the macro to the microscopic.

MEETING 02 Things and Objects

Elizabeth Grosz, ‘The Thing’, in Architecture from the Outside: Essays on Virtual and Real Space, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2001.

Jane Bennett, ‘The Force of Things: Steps Toward an Ecology of Matter’, in Political Theory, Vol. 32, No. 3, June 2004, pp. 347-372.

FURTHER READING:

Arjun Appadurai, ‘The Thing Itself’ in Public Culture, 18.1, Duke University Press, 2006. (see also Appadurai’s introduction to: Arjun Appadurai, ed. The Social Life of Things: Commodities in Cultural Perspective, Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 1988.)

Martin Heidegger, ‘The Thing’ in Poetry, Language, Thought, trans. Albert Hofstader, New York: Harper Collins, 2001.

Graham Harman, ‘Heidegger on Objects and Things’ in Bruno Latour and Peter Weibel, eds. Atmospheres of Democracy: Making Things Public, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 2005.

Timothy Morton, ‘Here Comes Everything: The Promise of Object-Oriented Ontology’, in Qui Parle: Critical Humanities and Social Sciences, Vol. 19, No. 2, Summer/Spring 2011, pp. 163-190.

INSTRUCTION 02: Select a ‘technological’ thing or object that has some relation to your ‘site’. Assume an expanded sense of what a technological object or thing might be; a definition that goes beyond the idea of machines or engineering feats. Based on your readings, reflect upon whether a difference can be determined between objects and things? When you choose your object or thing imagine how it can be discussed or even retrofitted as a ‘feminist design power tool’.

MEETING 03 Containers and Matter

Katie Lloyd Thomas , ‘Going into the Mould’ in Radical Philosophy, vol. 144, July/August 2007, pp. 16-25.

Zoe Sofia, ‘Container Technologies’ in Hypatia Vol. 15, No. 2, Spring 2000, pp. 181-200.

FURTHER READING:

Karen Barad, ‘Posthumanist Performativity: Toward an Understanding of How Matter Comes to Matter’ in Stacy Alaimo and Susan Hekman, eds., Material Feminisms, Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2008.

Elizabeth Grosz, ‘Woman, Chora, Dwelling’ in Jane Rendell, Barbara Penner, Iain Borden, eds, Gender Space Architecture: An Interdisciplinary Introduction, London: Routledge, 2000, pp. 1-5.

Interior architectural example of the ‘Frankfurt Kitchen’:

Susan R. Henderson, ‘A Revolution in the Woman’s Sphere: Greta Lihotszky and the Frankfurt Kitchen’ in Debra Coleman, Elizabeth Danze, Carol Henderson, eds, Architecture and Feminism, New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1996.

Thomas Elsaesser, ‘The Camera in the Kitchen: Grete Schütte-Lihotsky and Domestic Modernity’ in Christiane Schönfeld (ed), Practicing Modernity: Female Creativity in the Weimar Republic, Verlag Königshausen and Neumann, 2006.

See also Hilde Heynen and Gülsüm Baydar, eds. Negotiating Domesticity: Spatial Productions of Gender in Modern Architecture, London: Routledge, 2005.

INSTRUCTION 03: Select a container and/or discuss a material specification or a material relation as a means to further situate and discuss your selected ‘posthuman landscape’. Matter here turns out to be something that is quite lively, and may even exhibit an agency of its own. Containers such as bowls, plumbing, bottles, even houses, are the kinds of technologies that we take for granted when we place an emphasis instead on projectile technologies such as cars, planes, rockets and also various war machines (see Zoe Sofia).

MEETING 04 Networks and Agents

Judy Wajcman, ‘TechnoCapitalism Meets TechnoFeminism: Women and Technology in a Wireless World, in Labour and Industry, vol. 16, No. 3, April-May 2006, pp. 7-20.

Bruno Latour, ‘Technology is Society Made Durable’, in John Laws, ed. The Sociology of Monsters: Essays in Power, Technology and Domination, London: Routledge, 1991.

FURTHER READING

Fallan, ‘Architecture in Action: Travelling with Actor Network Theory in the Land of Architectural Research’ in Architectural Theory Review, 13.1, 2008, pp. 80-96.

Bernard Stiegler, ‘Introduction’, in Technics and Time, 1: The Fault of Epimetheus, Stanford, California: Stanford University Press, 1998.

Judy Wajcman, ‘Feminist Theories of Technology’ in Cambridge Journal of Economics, 2009.

INSTRUCTION 04: Diagram a network in which your technological thing or object operates. How is a network different from a ‘site’? What is the relation between network and site? Does your thing or object operate as an ‘agent’ in the network that makes your site operational? What relations and effects does your thing or object procure in its network in relation to its site?

MEETING 05 Machines and Prostheses

Donna Haraway, ‘Cyborg Manifesto’ in Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention of Nature, London: Free Association Books, 1991, pp. 149-

N. Katherine Hayles, ‘Unfinished Work: From Cyborg to Cognisphere’ in Theory Culture Society 23; 159, 2006.

Alice Jardine, ‘Of Bodies and Technologies’ in Hal Foster, ed. Discussions in Contemporary Culture, DIA Art Foundations, no. 1, 1987, pp. 151-172.

FURTHER READING

Susan Hekman, ‘Constructing the Ballast: An Ontology for Feminism’, in Stacy Alaimo and Susan hekman, eds, Material Feminisms, pp. 85-119.

Bruno Latour, ‘Why Has Critique Run Out of Steam? From Matters of Fact to Maters of Concern’ in Critical Inquiry, 30, University of Chicago Press, Winter 2004, pp. 225-248.

Georges Teyssot, ‘The Mutant Body of Architecture’, in Diller and Scofidio, eds, Flesh: Architectural Probes, New York: Princeton Architectural Press, pp. 8-35.

FOR some historical situating of the ‘machine’ in architectural theory see:

Reynar Banham, Theory and Design in the First Machine Age, London: The Architectural Press, 1970.

Sigfried Gideon, Mechanization Takes Command: A Contribution to Anonymous History, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014 (first published 1948).

Vitruvius, Book X [Dedicated to Machines and Instruments], On Architecture, London: Penguin, 2009 (originally written c. 20BC).

INSTRUCTION 05: Now step back and reconsider how your ‘posthuman landscape’ and things (or objects) operate together like a machine and its parts: parts in relations to other parts in relation to the operation of the assemblage as a whole. This week we will discuss how quickly technology becomes integrated into the daily habits of the human actor, becoming a ‘prosthesis’ that supports (and also inhibits) the functioning of a body. Is the (anthropocene) body more organism or more machine, or a hybrid of both? The term ‘cyborg’ as discussed by Donna Haraway will be a useful concept-tool here.

MEETING 06 Noopolitics and Information

Deborah Hauptmann, ‘Introduction: Architecture and Mind in the Age of Communication and Information’, in Deborah Hauptman, eds. Cognitive Architecture: From Biopolitics to Noopolitics, Rotterdam 010 Publishers, 2010.

Sally Wyatt, ‘Feminism, Technology and the Information Society: Learning from the Past, Imagining the Future’ in Information, Communication & Society, 2008, Vol.11(1), p.111-130.

FURTHER READING:

Rick Dolphijn and Iris van der Tuin, ‘The End of (Wo)Man’ in Rick Dolphijn and Iris van der Tuin, eds. New Materialism: Interviews and Cartographies, Ann Arbor: Open Humanities Press, 2012.

Maurizio Lazzarato, ”Exiting Language,” seminotic systems and the production of Subjectivity in Félix Guattari’ in Deborah Hauptman, eds. Cognitive Architecture: From Biopolitics to Noopolitics, Rotterdam 010 Publishers, 2010.

Maurizio Lazzarato,, ‘The Concepts of Life and the Living in the Societies of Control’ in Martin Fuglsang and Bent Meier Sorensen, eds. Deleuze and the Social, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006.

INSTRUCTION 06: Yet another aspect of the ‘posthuman landscape’ and the things (or objects) that populate it, also the networks formed across such milieus, and the role of machinic relations, is the way information is circulated. Noopolitics is a key term in relation to information. It is a concept that describes how minds (nous: noo) in the information age often enter into unwitting collaboration, which manifests, for instance, as local and global market trends, the predictability of consumer behavior, and even the increasingly predictable modes of inhabitation that are performed in urban contexts.

MEETING 07 Conclusion In the concluding seminar Posthuman Landscapes Storybooks will be presented.

INSTRUCTION 07: This week is when your posthuman landscape comes together. All seminar participants will share their discoveries through the presentation of a draft of a posthuman landscapes and things storybook. Each presenter will be paired with a respondent who will have read the work before it is presented, and who will be prepared to offer critical and constructive feedback.  

GENERAL READERS on Gender, Technology, ‘New Materialism’:

-Stacy Alaimo, Susan Hekman, eds, Material Feminisms, Bloomington and Indianapolis: Indiana University Press, 2008.

-Mary Wyer, Mary Barbercheck, Donna Cookmeyer, Hatice Örük Oztürk, Marta Wayne, eds, Women, Science, and Technology: A Reader in Feminist Science Studies, London: Routledge, 2014.

-Linda L. Layne, Sharra L. Vostral, Kate Boyer, eds. Feminist Technology, Urbana, Chicago and Springfield: University of Ilinois Press, 2010. -Nina Lehman, Ruth Oldenziel, Arwen P. Mohun, eds. Gender and Technology: A Reader, Baltimore: Maryland, John Hopkins University Press, 2003.

Further Essays on Feminist Philosophy

Michèle Le Doeuff, ‘Women and Philosophy’ in Radical Philosophy, Vol. 017, Summer 1977, 2-11.

READINGS+LECTURES::Architecture+Gender: Feminist Design Power-Tools

June 19, 2013

Meeting 01 25 September INTRODUCTION

Meike Schalk, Brady Burroughs, Katja Grillner, Katarina Bonnevier (2012) ‘Fatale Critical Studies in Architecture’ in Nordic, Vol. 2, 90-96.

Further Reading: Donna Haraway, ‘Situated Knowledges: The Science Question in Feminism and the Privilege of Partial Perspectives’, in Feminist Studies, pp. 575–599, 1988.

Meeting 02 2 October FEMINIST MANIFESTOS

Katherine Shonfield, ‘Premature Gratification and Other Pleasures’ in This is What we do: a muf manual, London: Elipsis London, 2001.

Leslie Kanes Weisman, ‘Women’s Environmental Rights: A Manifesto’ in Jane Rendell, Barbara Penner, Iain Borden, eds, Gender Space Architecture: An Interdisciplinary Introduction, London: Routledge, 2000, pp. 1-5.

LECTURE One: Lisa Deurell and Frida Bostrom of Kvinnors Byggforum

Practice: See muf architecture/art website: http://www.muf.co.uk

For a list of feminist manifestos see: http://www.ktpress.co.uk/feminist-art-manifestos.asp Brooklyn

Museum Feminist Art Base, https://www.brooklynmuseum.org/eascfa/feminist_art_base/index.php

Meeting 03 9 October ALTERING PRACTICES

Doina Petrescu, ‘Altering Practices’ in Altering Practices: Feminist Politics and Poetics of Space, London: Routledge, 2007.

Lori Brown, ‘Introduction’ Lori Brown, ed., Feminist Practices: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Women in Architecture, London: Ashgate, 2011.

LECTURE Two: Ramia Mazé, Critical (design) Practice

Practice: See atelier d’architecture autogérée website: http://www.urbantactics.org

Nishat Awan, Tatjana Schneider, Jeremy Till, eds, Spatial Agency: Other Ways of Doing Architecture, London: Routledge, 2011.

Re·Architecture exhibition, Pavillon de l’Arsenal, Paris, 12 April 2012-20 August 2012 http://www.pavillon-arsenal.com/en/expositions/thema_modele.php?id_exposition=246

Meeting 04 16 October BODY-BUILDING

Elizabeth Diller, ‘Bad Press’ in Francesca Hughes, ed. The Architect Reconstructing her Practice, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press, 1996, pp. 74-95.

Georges Teyssot, ‘The Mutant Body of Architecture’ in Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio, Flesh: Architectural Probes, New York, Princeton Architectural Press, 1994.

LECTURE Three: Thérèse Kristiansson from Mycket (mycket.org) and The New Beauty Council (newbeautycouncil.org)

Practice:

See the work of Niki de Saint Phalle http://www.nikidesaintphalle.com (there is currently an exhibition of her work at Modernamuseet Stockholm)

See the work of body and performance artist Orlan, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Orlan; http://oldsite.english.ucsb.edu/faculty/ecook/courses/eng114em/whoisorlan.htm

See the work of Cindy Sherman, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cindy_Sherman; http://www.cindysherman.com

See the work of Marina Abramović, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marina_Abramović Elles exhibition, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 27 May 2009 – 11 February 2011, http://www.centrepompidou.fr/cpv/ressource.action?param.id=FR_R-28334c6bee53a6e8533a4449ae55394e&param.idSource=FR_E-dc64d3ee3d83d6d265be583d2a67d238

Further reading

Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, ‘How to Make Yourself a Body Without Organs’ in A Thousand Plateaus, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1987.

Meeting 05 06 November ARCHI-TECHNO-GIRLS

Zoe Sofia, ‘Container Technologies’ in Hypatia Vol. 15, No. 2, Spring 2000, pp. 181-200.

Donna Haraway, ‘Cyborg Manifesto’ in Simians, Cyborgs, and Women: The Reinvention of Nature, London: Free Association Books, 1991, pp. 149-

Lecture Four: Ulrika Knagenhielm-Karlsson SERVO Stockholm; KTH Architecture Performative studio

Practice:

See Louise Bourgeois’s cells and sketches (also undertake a simple google image search for ‘Louise Bourgeois’s cells’): http://arttattler.com/archivebourgeois.html

Ulrika Karlsson and Marcelyn Gow, SERVO http://www.s-e-r-v-o.com

Alyssa Andrasek, BioThing, http://www.biothing.org -François Roche and Stephanie Lavaux, R&Sie, http://www.new-territories.com

Further Reading: Elizabeth Grosz, ‘Woman, Chora, Dwelling’ in Jane Rendell, Barbara Penner, Iain Borden, eds, Gender Space Architecture: An Interdisciplinary Introduction, London: Routledge, 2000, pp. 1-5.

Meeting 06 20 November ÉCRITURE FEMININE

Hélène Cixous, ‘Coming to Writing’ in Hélène Cixous, Coming to Writing and Other Essays, Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press, 1991.

Jane RendellSite-Writing: The Architecture of Art Criticism, London: I.B. Tauris, 2010.

Lecture Five: Katja Grillner, Critical Studies in Architecture, KTH Architecture, and Architecture in Effect (Strong Research Environment)

Practice:

Julieanna Preston, ‘Blazing Interalia: Tropes of a Femnist Spatial Practice,’ in Lori A. Brown, ed. Feminist Practices: Interdisciplinary Approaches to Women in Architecture, Farnham, Surrey: Ashgate, 2011.

Brigid McLeer, ‘Stray Sod: Eight dispositions on feminine space and writing’ in Altering Practices: Feminist Politics and Poetics of Space, London: Routledge, 2007.

Further Reading

Gilles Deleuze, ‘Literature and Life’ in Gilles Deleuze: Essays Critical and Clinical, Daniel W. Smith trans., London: Verso, 1998, pp. 1-6.

Meeting 07 4 December MATERIALIST ETHICS

Jane Bennett, ‘A Vitalist Stopover on the Way to a New Materialism’ in Diana Coole and Samantha Frost, eds. New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010, pp. 47-69.

Peg Rawes, ‘Introduction’; ‘Touching and Sensing’ in Peg Rawes, Irigaray for Architects, London: Routledge, 2007.

Lecture Six: (NOTE to be held Thursday 5 December 2013): Peg Rawes, Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, London, UK

Practice: Mierle Ukeles ‘Sanitation Manifesto’ (1984), also reproduced in Kristine Stiles and Peter Selz (eds) Theories and Documents of Contemporary Art (1996) http://www.ktpress.co.uk/feminist-art-manifestos.asp

See the work of Margit Bruenner:

http://www.flickr.com/photos/margit_bruenner/page1/
https://vimeo.com/user9538956/videos

Helen Stratford, ‘Unpleasant Matters’ in Katie Lloyd Thomas, Material Matters: Architecture and Material Practice, London: Routledge, 2007.

Yve Alain Bois and Rosalind E. Krauss, curators, L’Informe: Mode de’emploi, Centre Pompidou, Paris, 22 May-26 August, 1996 and Yve-Alain Bois and Rosalind E. Krauss, Formless: A User’s Guide, New York: Zone Books, 1997. See review: http://www.frieze.com/issue/review/linforme_mode_demploi/

Further reading: Verena Andermatt Conley, ‘Eco-Subjects’ in Verena Andermatt Conley, ed. Rethinking Technologies, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 1993, pp. 77-91.

Meeting 09 WEEK 50 Thursday 12 December 13.00-16.30 CONCLUSION: PRESENTATIONS in A4

READINGS::Material Assemblages and Affective Atmospheres

August 30, 2012

Critical Studies of Architecture, KTH Architecture, elective seminar

Part One: New Materialism or Material Assemblages

01 Wednesday 19 September

Katie Lloyd Thomas ed. ‘Introduction’, Material Matters: Architecture and Material Practice, London: Routledge, 2007.

Diana Coole and Samantha Frost, ‘Introducing the New Materialism’, in Diana Coole and Samantha Frost, eds, New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

Philip Beesley, Hylozoic Ground

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=PYjGhftfAFo&feature=endscreen&NR=1

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v86B9Nz_LVU&feature=related

02 Wednesday 10 October

Jane Bennett, ‘Preface’; and ‘The Agency of Assemblages’, in Vibrant Matter: A Political Ecology of Things, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

Further Reading:

Jane Bennett, ‘A Vitalist Stopover on the Way to a New Materialism’, in Diana Coole and Samantha Frost, eds, New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

03 Wednesday 17 October

Manuel DeLanda, ‘Deleuze, Materialism and Politics ’, in Ian Buchanan and N. Thoburn, eds, Deleuze and Politics, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2008.

Manuel DeLanda, A Thousand Years of Nonlinear History, New York: Swerve, 2000. Excerpt.

04 Wednesday 7 November

Judith Butler, ‘Bodies that Matter’, in Bodies that Matter: On the Discursive Limits of Sex, London: Routledge, 1993.

Elizabeth Grosz, ‘Feminism, Materialism, and Freedom’, in Diana Coole and Samantha Frost, eds, New Materialisms: Ontology, Agency, and Politics, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

Part Two: Affective Atmospheres

05 Wednesday 21 November

Nigel Thrift, ‘Spatialities of Feeling’ in Non-Representational Theory: Space, Politics, Affect, London: Routledge, 2008.

Eric Shouse, ‘Feeling, Emotion, Affect’, in Melissa Gregg, ed. ‘Affect.’ M/C Journal 8.6 (2005). 25 Nov. 2011. http://journal.media-culture.org.au/0512/03-shouse.php

Background Reading on Affect:

Gregory Seijworth and Melissa Gregg ‘An Inventory of Shimmers’ in Gregory Seijworth and Melissa Gregg eds. The Affect Theory Reader, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

Melissa Gregg, ed. ‘Affect.’ M/C Journal 8.6 (2005). 25 Nov. 2011

http://journal.media-culture.org.au/0512/

06 Wednesday 28 November

David Gissen, ‘Part One: Atmosphere’, in Subnature: Architecture’s Other Environments, New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 2009.

Ben Anderson, ‘Affective Atmospheres’, in Emotion, Space and Society 2, 2009, pp. 77-81.

07 Wednesday 5 December

Peter Sloterdijk, ‘Atmospheres of Democracy’, in Bruno Latour and Peter Weibel, eds, Making Things Public: Atmospheres of Democracy, Cambridge, Mass: MIT Press, 2005.

Peter Sloterdijk, ‘Gas Warfare–or: The Atmoterrorist Model, in Terror From the Air, LA: Semiotext(e), 2009.

08 Wednesday 12 December

Presentation of completed Colouring-In Books

READINGS::The Logic of Sensation (In the Institution): TAKE 2

November 25, 2011

Seminar One: Affective Introduction 15/02/12

Gregory Seijworth and Melissa Gregg ‘An Inventory of Shimmers’ in Gregory Seijworth and Melissa Gregg eds. The Affect Theory Reader, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

Affect Theory Reader

See the special issue of M/C Journal dedicated to the theme of affect, and edited by Melissa Gregg. Please read the editorial:

Gregg, Melissa. ‘Affect.’ M/C Journal 8.6 (2005). 25 Nov. 2011

http://journal.media-culture.org.au/0512/

Seminar Two: Sensation 22/02/12

-Gilles Deleuze, ‘The Diagram’, in The Logic of Sensation, London: Continuum, 2003.

DeleuzeDiagram

-Gilles Deleuze, ‘Painting and Sensation’, in The Logic of Sensation, London: Continuum, 2003.

DeleuzePaintingandSensation

Further Reading

Daniel W. Smith, ‘Deleuze on Bacon’, in The Logic of Sensation, London: Continuum, 2003.

SmithIntroDeleuzeLogicSensation

Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, ‘Percept, Affect, Concept’ in What is Philosophy?, New York: Columbia University Press, 1994.

PerceptAffectConcept

Seminar Three: Affect 29/02/12

-Brian Massumi, The Autonomy of Affect, in Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002.

MassumiAutonomyofAffect

-Brian Massumi, ‘Of Microperception and Micropolitics, in Inflexions online journal, no. 3, October 2009. http://www.senselab.ca/inflexions/

MassumiandMcKim OfMicroperceptionandMicropolitics

Seminar Four: Feeling 07/03/12

-Nigel Thrift, ‘Spatialities of Feeling’ in Non-Representational Theory: Space, Politics, Affect, London: Routledge, 2008. 

Thrift Non-Representational Theory

-Sylvia Lavin, Kissing Architecture, Princeton: Princeton University Press, 2011.

LavinKissingArchitecture2

Seminar Five: Prisons and Clinics 18/04/12

Michel Foucault, ‘Panopticism’ in Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, London: Penguin, 1991.

Foucault Panopticon

Michel Foucault, ‘Complete and Austere Institutions’ in Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, London: Penguin, 1991.

Foucault Prisons

-Michel Foucault, ‘Spaces and Classes’ in The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception, London: Routledge, 1989.

Foucault BirthoftheClinic

Further reading:

-Michel Foucault, ‘Of Other Spaces’ in Diacritics, vol. 16, no. 1, Spring, 1986, pp. 22-27.

Foucault OfOtherSpaces

Seminar Six: Museums 25/04/12

-Tony Bennett, ‘The Exhibitionary Complex’, The Birth of the Museum: History, Theory, Politics, London: Routledge, 1995, excerpt, pp. 59-79.

Bennett The Exhibitionary Complex

-Douglas Crimp, ‘On the Museum’s Ruins’ in Hal Foster, ed., Postmodern Culture, London: Pluto Press, 1985, pp. 43-56. (Also available online as a google book. See in this edition Rosalind Krauss’s seminal essay, ‘Sculpture in the Expanded Field’).

Crimp Museums Ruins

Seminar Seven: Control Societies and Corporate Spaces 02/05/12

Gilles Deleuze, ‘Postscript on Societies of Control’ in Negotiations: 1972-1990, New York: Columbia University Press, 1995.

Deleuze Postscript on Societies of Control

Maurizio Lazzarato, ‘The Concepts of Life and the Living in the Societies of Control’ in Martin Fuglsang and Bent Meier Sorensen, eds. Deleuze and the Social, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006.

Lazzarato The Concepts of Life… 

Reinhold Martin, The Organisational Complex: Architecture, Media, and Corporate Space, Cambridge Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2003.

Martin Organizational Complex

Seminar Eight: Secret Societies and Concluding Discussion 09/05/12

Jan Verwoert, ‘Exhaustion an Exuberance’ in Tell Me What You Want, What You Really, Really Want, Sternberg Press, 2010.

Jan Verwoert Exhaustion

Jan Verwoert, How do we share? The secret? How will we experience? The mysteries? in Cristina Ricupero, Alexis Vaillant, Max Hollein, eds. Secret Societies, Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, CAPC Museé d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, Snoek.

JanVerwoert Secret Societies

READINGS::The Logic of Sensation 2011

July 13, 2011

READINGS

Architecture+Philosophy: The Logic of Sensation (in the institution)

Week One: Sensation

-Gilles Deleuze, ‘Painting and Sensation’, in The Logic of Sensation, London: Continuum, 2003.

DeleuzePaintingandSensation

-Gilles Deleuze, ‘The Diagram’, in The Logic of Sensation, London: Continuum, 2003.

DeleuzeDiagram

Week Two: Affect

-Brian Massumi, The Autonomy of Affect, in Parables for the Virtual: Movement, Affect, Sensation, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2002.

MassumiAutonomyofAffect

-Brian Massumi, ‘Of Microperception and Micropolitics, in Inflexions online journal, no. 3, October 2009. http://www.senselab.ca/inflexions/

MassumiandMcKim OfMicroperceptionandMicropolitics

Week Three: Bodies

Georges Teyssot, ‘The Mutant Body of Architecture’ in Elizabeth Diller and Ricardo Scofidio, Flesh: Architectural Probes, New York: Princeton Architectural Press, 1994.

Teyssot MutantBodies

Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, ‘November 28, 1947: How to Make Yourself a Body Without Organs’ in A Thousand Plateaus, Minneapolis and London: University of Minnesota Press, 1987.

DeleuzeGuattari AThousandPlateaus

Week Four: Feeling

-Nigel Thrift, ‘Intensities of Feeling: Towards a Spatial Politics of Affect, in Geografiska Annaler: Series B, Human Geography, Volume 86, Issue 1,  March 2004, pp. 57–78.    

Thrift – Intensities of Feeling – Towards a Spatial Politics of Affect

-Nigel Thrift, ‘Spatialities of Feeling’ in Non-Representational Theory: Space, Politics, Affect, London: Routledge, 2008. 

Thrift Non-Representational Theory 

PLEASE NOTE these are two versions of the same essay. The second version is included in a collection of essays you may want to make further reference to.

Week Five: Clinics and Hospitals

-Michel Foucault, ‘Spaces and Classes’ in The Birth of the Clinic: An Archaeology of Medical Perception, London: Routledge, 1989.

Foucault BirthoftheClinic

-Michel Foucault, ‘Of Other Spaces’ in Diacritics, vol. 16, no. 1, Spring, 1986, pp. 22-27.

Foucault OfOtherSpaces

Week Six: Museums

-Tony Bennett, ‘The Exhibitionary Complex’, The Birth of the Museum: History, Theory, Politics, London: Routledge, 1995, excerpt, pp. 59-79.

Bennett The Exhibitionary Complex

-Douglas Crimp, ‘On the Museum’s Ruins’ in Hal Foster, ed., Postmodern Culture, London: Pluto Press, 1985, pp. 43-56. (Also available online as a google book. See in this edition Rosalind Krauss’s seminal essay, ‘Sculpture in the Expanded Field’).

Crimp Museums Ruins

Week Seven: Prisons

Michel Foucault, ‘Panopticism’ in Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, London: Penguin, 1991.

Foucault Panopticon

Michel Foucault, ‘Complete and Austere Institutions’ in Discipline and Punish: The Birth of the Prison, London: Penguin, 1991.

Foucault Prisons

Week Eight: Secret Societies

Jan Verwoert, ‘Exhaustion an Exuberance’ in Tell Me What You Want, What You Really, Really Want, Sternberg Press, 2010.

Jan Verwoert Exhaustion

Jan Verwoert, How do we share? The secret? How will we experience? The mysteries? in Cristina Ricupero, Alexis Vaillant, Max Hollein, eds. Secret Societies, Schirn Kunsthalle Frankfurt, CAPC Museé d’art contemporain de Bordeaux, Snoek.

JanVerwoert Secret Societies

Week Nine: Control Societies

Gilles Deleuze, ‘Postscript on Societies of Control’ in Negotiations: 1972-1990, New York: Columbia University Press, 1995.

Deleuze Postscript on Societies of Control

Maurizio Lazzarato, ‘The Concepts of Life and the Living in the Societies of Control’ in Martin Fuglsang and Bent Meier Sorensen, eds. Deleuze and the Social, Edinburgh: Edinburgh University Press, 2006.

Lazzarato The Concepts of Life… 

Week Ten: Corporate Space

Reinhold Martin, The Organisational Complex: Architecture, Media, and Corporate Space, Cambridge Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2003.

Martin Organizational Complex

Week Eleven: Catalogues

-Michel Foucault, ‘Preface’, in  The Order of Things, London: Routledge, 1970.

Foucault The Order of Things

-Susan Stewart, ‘Part 2: The Miniature’, On Longing: Narratives of the Miniature, the Gigantic, the Souvenir, the Collection, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 1993.

Stewart Miniature On Longing

Further Reading…

-Robert Harbison, ‘Contracted World: Museums and Catalogues’ in Eccentric Spaces, Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 2000, pp. 140-162.

HarbisonEccentricSpaceMuseums

Week Twelve: Affective Conclusion

Gregory Seijworth and Melissa Gregg ‘An Inventory of Shimmers’ in Gregory Seijworth and Melissa Gregg eds. The Affect Theory Reader, Durham and London: Duke University Press, 2010.

Affect Theory Reader

READINGS::Architectural Violence and Creative Resistance 2011

February 17, 2011

Architectural Violence and Creative Resistance, Semester One, 2011

Weekly Required Readings

Week One

-Eyal Weisman, ‘Lethal Theory’ in Log 7, Winter/Spring 2006, pp. 53-77.

Eyal Weizman_Lethal Theory

-Assemblage 20, MIT Press, April 1993. Special edition dedicated to Violence and Space.

Assemblage essay-Architecture and Violence

FURTHER READINGS:

-Michel Foucault and Gilles Deleuze, ‘Intellectuals and Power’, in Language, Counter-Memory, Practice, Donald F. Bouchard and Sherry Simon, trans. (Ithaca, New York: Cornell University Press, 1977).

Foucault and Deleuze, Intellectuals and Power

-Peter Blundell Jone, Doina Petresco, Jeremy Till, editors, Architecture and Participation, London: Taylor and Francis, 2005. (This book is available as an ebook in the RMIT Library. This week, as discussed in class, I recommend you read: Giancarlo De Carlo, ‘Architecture’s Public’, pages 3-22.)

-Jane Rendell, Jonathan Hill, Murray Fraser, Mark Dorrian, eds, Critical Architecture, London: Routledge, 2007. (This is also available as an ebook!!! Rendell’s introduction will give you an excellent background to the question of what is critical theory, which arose during the discussion today).

Week Two

Michael Sorkin, ‘Introduction: Up Against the Wall’ in Against the Wall: Israel’s Barrier to Peace, New York: The New Press, 2005.

Michael Sorkin Against the Wall

FURTHER READINGS:

Gilles Deleuze and Félix Guattari, ‘1440: The Smooth and the Striated’ in A Thousand Plateaus, Minneapolis: The University of Minnesota Press, 1987.

DeleuzeGuattari1000PlateausSmoothStriated

Week Three

-Giorgio Agamben, ‘Beyond Human Rights’ in Means Without Ends, Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2000.

Agamben Means Without Ends

-Hannah Arendt, ‘We Refugees’ in Mennorah Journal, vol. 31, 1943.

Hannah Arendt We REFUGEES

Week Four

-Giorgio Agamben, ‘The Camp as the ‘Nomos’ of the Modern’, in Homo Sacer: Sovereign Power and Bare Life, Stanford, California: Stanford Universit Press, 1998.

Giorgio Agamben Homo Sacer

Week Five

-Lieven De Cauter, ‘The Capsule and the Network: Notes for a General Theory’ in The Capsular Civilization, Rotterdam: NAi Publishers, 2004.

De Cauter Capsuler civilization

FURTHER READINGS:

Michel Foucault, Of Other Spaces, Diacritics, 1986.

FoucaultOfOtherSpacesDiacritics1986

Week Six

-David Harvey, ‘Right to the City’, in New Left Review 53, September/October 2008, pp. 23-40.

Harvey Right to the City

Week Seven

– Peter Sloterdijk, ‘Foam-City,’ in Log 9, Winter/Spring 2007.

SloterdijkFoamCity

Week Eight

Michel Foucault, ‘Space, Knowledge and Power’ in Power, London: Penguin, 2000, pp. 349-364.

Foucault on Power

Week Nine

-Walter Benjamin, ‘Critique of Violence’ in Reflections, New York: Schocken Books, 1978.

Benjamin Critique of Violence

Week Ten

Jacques Derrida, ‘On Cosmopolitanism’ in On Cosmopolitanism and Forgiveness, London: Routledge, 2002.

Derrida On Cosmopolitanism

Week Eleven

Isabelle Stengers, ‘The Cosmopolitical Proposal’, in Bruno Latour and Peter Weibel, eds. Making Things Public: Atmospheres of Democracy, MIT Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, 2005.

Stengers Cosmopolitical

Herman Melville, ‘Bartleby’, in in Billy Budd, Sailor and Other Stories, London: Penguin Classics, 1970.

MelvilleBartleby

Week Twelve

Slavov Zizek, ‘Passions of the Real, Passions of Semblance’ in Welcome to the Desert of the Real, London: Verso, 2002.

Zizek Welcome to the Desert…

In preparation for Teresa’s presentation in our final seminar, please refer to the documents below:

StoppaniVIOLENTACTSpart1

StoppaniVIOLENTACTSpart2