Posts Tagged ‘LA’

Loren’s Essay

June 8, 2011

Please click here to be directed to my Architecture and Violence Essay on issuu.

[ http://issuu.com/archandphil/docs/lorenfrances_essay ]

 

Hackerless Hacktivism :

Misconceptions about the digital panopticon and our quest for radical transparency

The ubiquity of, and increasing ease of access to, information in our digital age relies on a necessary dissolution of spatial boundaries in our shared virtual topography. The city can no longer depend entirely on physical obstructions to demarcate space – and as virtual networks continue to be forged globally, the authority of our physical boundaries has been severely compromised. With this dynamic dissolution and reconfiguration of boundaries comes speculation about the benefit and appropriateness of our newfound ability to make such immediate and unrestricted connections – and a subsequent paranoia about humanity’s subscription to a panoptic mode of living.

This essay seeks to examine the nature of the boundary condition between the overlapping existential threads of physical and virtual space, with particular reference to the way in which information is voluntarily or unconsciously disseminated across a de-territorialized or partially territorialized virtual topography via Google’s Street View.

In order to formulate an argument with respect to architecture, violence and creative resistance, the following points will be explored: –

  • First, the limits of ‘architecture’ – as viewed through the cultural lens of our contemporary digital information society – and thus the significance of the relationship between cityspace and cyberspace to the networked individual.
  • Next, the way in which Google Street View may be perceived as a violent apparatus through the dominant paradigm of the digital panopticon.
  • And finally, the way in which this panoptic analogy – regardless of its pertinence or accuracy – may be creatively resisted or championed by acts of ‘hackerless hactivism’. Using the works of self-proclaimed ‘Street View Artists’ Jon Rafman, Robin Hewlett and Ben Kinsley, in addition to the reported pendulum of debate regarding Google’s recently implemented Street View Opt Out Policy in Germany, this capacity for resistance against a system of perceived oppression will be classified and described according to two modes – that which aspires to destroy the system, and that which aspires to subvert the system.

Loren’s Colouring Book

June 2, 2011

Please click here to be directed to my Architecture and Violence colouring book on issuu.

[ http://issuu.com/archandphil/docs/lorenfrances_colouring ]

Welcome to the Des(s)ert of The Real!

May 26, 2011

The Treachery of Condiments : Products Deprived of Malignant Properties

[ A response to Slavoj Zizek’s ‘Passions of the Real, Passions of the Semblance’ ]

CRITIQUE

The Idiot and the Politician

May 19, 2011

The Idiot and The Politician : Political Force and Indifference

[ A response to Isabel Stengers’ ‘Cosmopolitical Proposal’ ]

CRITIQUE

Welcome?

May 12, 2011

Welcome? : The Cold Shoulder

[ A response to Jacques Derrida’s ‘On Cosmopolitanism’ ]

CRITIQUE

The Many Faces of Violence

May 5, 2011

The Many Faces of Violence : Perspective is Everything

[ A response to Walter Benjamin’s ‘Critique of Violence’ ]

CRITIQUE

The Architect Has No Power Over Me

April 28, 2011

Puppet Master Dream : The Architect Has No Power Over Me

[ A response to Michel Foucault’s ‘Space, Knowledge and Power’ ]

CRITIQUE

Dough – Foam – Island

April 14, 2011

Dough – Foam – Island : Moments of Interconnectivity

[ A response to Peter Sloterdijk’s ‘Foam City’ ]

CRITIQUE

A Slice of City Pie

April 7, 2011

A Slice of City Pie : Why is Your Piece Bigger Than Mine?

[ A response to David Harvey’s ‘Right to the City’ ]

CRITIQUE

Heresy, Hacktivism and Hypocrisy

April 1, 2011

Misconceptions about the digital panopticon and the quest for radical transparency

Abstract

The ubiquity of, and increasing ease of access to, information in our digital age relies on a necessary dissolution of spatial boundaries in our shared virtual topography. The city can no longer depend entirely on physical obstructions to demarcate space – and as virtual networks continue to be forged globally, the authority of our physical boundaries has been severely compromised. With this dynamic dissolution and reconfiguration of boundaries comes speculation about the benefit and appropriateness of our newfound ability to make such immediate and unrestricted connections – and a subsequent paranoia about humanity’s subscription to a panoptic mode of living.

This essay seeks to examine the nature of the boundary condition in virtual space, with particular reference to the way in which information is voluntarily or unconsciously disseminated across a de-territorialized or partially territorialized virtual topography. In recent times, both Google Street View and WikiLeaks have attempted to provide mechanisms for the unrestricted dissemination of information – and both have been met with a pendulum of fierce public debate.

And so, in the formulation of this argument, the following will be examined: –

  1. The recently implemented “opt-out” policies enabling individuals to elect NOT to share images of their properties online via Google’s Street View, and the subsequent vandalism of “pixelated” homes in Essen, Germany;
  2. The distributed denial-of-service (DDoS) attacks on selected online financial providers by self-proclaimed “hacktivists” as a means of avenging the attempted closure of radical online advocate for political transparency, WikiLeaks

In dissecting the tug-of-war between resisting and advocating parties of radical online transparency in relation to these case studies, the relevance of the Orwellian analogy will be tested, and a judgement made as to whether our panoptic-paranoia is, in fact, warranted.

Yes, Big Brother is watching you. But aren’t you also watching him?

Progressive Bibliography ]